University Continues to Benefit From Colonial Land Confiscations

Te Wharepora Hou

I was shocked today to read that Victoria University is set to sell the Karori Campus for $20million. What is shocking is not only the sale, but the fact that the government sold the land to the University in 2014 for $10.

Numerous media outlets have covered this story, with Radio NZ stating “The Karori campus was acquired from the government for $10 in 2014. It covers 3.7ha and includes 20 buildings.” (http://www.radionz.co.nz/news/national/312117/victoria-university-to-sell-$10-karori-campus). Some are advocating that the council should buy the land (http://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/AK1608/S00856/city-should-buy-victoria-universitys-karori-campus.htm). Concern has been expressed about the loss of an educational facility to the community (http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/education/83697513/victoria-university-decides-former-teachers-college-in-karori-is-surplus-to-requirements). Not one of those reports has raised the history of the land, the issue that if the land is ‘surplus to requirements’ that it be returned to the Iwi or the broader issues related to Treaty processes which demand that in similar situations Iwi are forced to pay $millions for…

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An Open Letter to Te Kotahitanga o Te Atiawa: Hold the Pekapeka Block

Te Wharepora Hou

Tena koutou katoa e nga whanaunga,

Nga mihi Puanga ki a koutou.

Over the past few weeks I have become increasingly concerned at the deal that is being supported with the NPDC by Te Kotahitanga o Te Atiawa. I wanted to share my concerns directly with you and I will also be sharing more widely through a range of mediums that reach Te Atiawa whanau.

In looking through the material I am yet to see or hear any meaningful reason why Te Atiawa would agree to the NPDC deal related to the Pekapeka Block. The rationale given appears to be one of a ‘this is the best we will get’ scenario which in my view, and that of our whanau, is an inadequate rationale for supporting a deal that clearly works against the best interests of the whanau, hapu and iwi of Te Atiawa.

While at home last week I…

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#handsoffaboriginalkids: In Solidarity

Te Wharepora Hou

Over the past two weeks we have been honoured to be hosted by the Jumbunna Research Institute at UTS.  This collaboration is a part of the strengthening of the relationships between Māori and Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islanders communities and researchers committing to working in ways that affirm an intention of tino rangatiratanga and self-determination for Indigenous Nations.   We have worked together exploring and sharing Indigenous research aspirations and approaches to our work.

During the past few days we have been reminded of, seen and heard of the horrific experiences and the abuses against Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders on their own lands. We take a position as Māori who are guests here on the lands of the Gadigal People in Sydney to bear witness and to inform our own people of the atrocities that continue against the Indigenous Peoples of this land.

Today we stood in Solidarity at the…

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Poi, Mau Rākau and the Impact of Colonial Thinking

Te Wharepora Hou

There has been much debate, uproar about, and defense of, the recently released rules for the 2016 Kura Tuarua kapa haka nationals. The Committee has made a significant change to the rules in announcing that there will be a change in marking the aggregate section of the kapa haka competition. It is noted, in the new 2016 rules, under the Judged Disciplines:
51. Aggregate Section: Only the marks of the following items will be counted in the Aggregate Section for Co-ed Groups:
• Te Reo Māori
• Whakaeke
• Waiata/koroua/Mōteatea
• Waiata-a-ringa
• Poi
• Haka
• Whakawātea

Aggregate Section : Only the marks of the following items will be counted in the Aggregate Section for Single Sex Female Groups:
• Te Reo Māori
• Whakaeke
• Waiata/koroua/Mōteatea
• Waiata-a-ringa
• Poi
• Haka Wahine
• Whakawātea

Aggregate Section : Only the marks of the following items will be counted…

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Colonial naming reproduces Historical Trauma

Te Wharepora Hou

Today I read a post that the Novotel in Taranaki has been named the Novotel New Plymouth Hobson with the restaurant called ‘The Governor’. I was immediately sickened by the lack of any sensitivity or thought for the impact of such naming on our people.

Naming is important. Name carry memories, names carry meaning, names carry history. The hotel sits on Hobson street and the owners of the Novotel have chosen to not only reproduce that in their naming of the hotel but to add more insult to our people through the naming of their restaurant.

This follows from the New Plymouth District council decision to name new streets in Waitara after a developers family and denying hapū the ability to name the streets.
http://www.radionz.co.nz/news/regional/296341/developer’s-name-for-new-subdivision-trumps-hapu’s

The impact of the decision was strongly voiced by Howie Tamati, and supported by the Mayor Andrew Judd, to the Taranaki Daily News:

But Councillor…

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National Perpetuates Poverty

Te Wharepora Hou

In the 1960’s the notion of the ‘cycle of poverty’ was a key phrase heard in relation to Indigenous, Black and Minority communities. The power of the idea that families were ‘locked’ into a ‘cycle’ of underachievement, unemployment and poverty due to their own failures gained precedence in the implementation of programmes that were considered to take on a challenge and to wage ‘war on poverty’. Programmes were focused on the percieved ‘deficits’ of those in poverty and were referred to as ‘cultural deprivation theories’. These theories are based upon an assumption that the overrepresentation of particular groups in educational underachievement, unemployment and poverty indices in society is due to their lacking of appropriate knowledge, skills, values and language modes which enable a successful experience within the education system. In defining cultural deprivation, in 1965, Bloom et.al argued,
“We will refer to this group as culturally disadvantaged or culturally deprived…

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John Key, hair pulling, name calling and the demeaning of rape victims.

Te Wharepora Hou

The past few days reports have flowed about the interview undertaken by the Prime Minister, John Key, on the Rock radio show, where Key participated in what must really be considered a sick prank on the part of the DJ’s involved.

Where the PM played down the supposed ‘joke’ International media were not forgiving with the UK Daily Mail stating:

“During the awkward interview on The Rock FM, Mr Key was asked to get into a cage and pick up a bar of soap.
He obediently picked up the soap to the delight of the radio hosts with one presenter saying that the prime minister had a ‘pretty little mouth’. After the stunt complaints were made about Mr Key making little of sexual abuse in prison.
‘He (John Key) has a terrible history of not standing up against sexual violence in this country,’ Deborah Russell, a feminist commentator and Massey…

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PM Insults are an act of State Abuse

Te Wharepora Hou

We have to seriously question the ability of anyone to govern a country when they resort to flippant offhand insults as a means by which to not respond in any meaningful way to critical issues. There seems to be two key approaches that PM John Key takes to avoiding important social justice issues (i) He Lies and (ii) He demeans those who challenge his position. In the case of Christmas Island, John Key has done both. The New Zealand herald described the interchange as follows:

The heated debate on New Zealanders detained on Christmas Island continued inside the House.
Under questioning by Labour leader Andrew Little, Mr Key went on a furious offensive.
In an angry attack, he said: “Some of the [detainees] are rapists, some of them are child molesters, and some of them are murderers.
“These are the people that the Labour Party are saying are more important…

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The Flag Conversation and Issues of Distraction

Te Wharepora Hou

Over the past few months there has been an intensified promotional campaign for the upcoming ‘flag referendum’ due to take pace in just a couple of weeks. It has been an interesting campaign to watch and I remain skeptical about the intention and timing of the process. On the whole however most people remain uninformed about the positioning of flags in Aotearoa and that there are multiple flags, and versions of the current flag that are used. Also little is shared in mainstream media about the original flag chosen on 20 March 1834 by Iwi within the north. This blog seeks to provide information that has been shared about the history of flags in Aotearoa.

The call for a new flag is not new. There has been long term discontent with the privileging of our colonisers representation of this country through the current national flag.   The ‘Politics of Distraction’ have…

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MSD actions perpetuates violence on vulnerable whanau.

Te Wharepora Hou

We should all be disturbed by the decision from MSD Deputy CEO Murray Edridge to end discussions with Relationship Aotearoa in regards to the ongoing provision of counselling support to over 7,000 people across the country. Over 2,500 of those are Maori.   There needs to be questions asked as to where the CEO Brendan Boyle has been throughout this whole debacle. We have been fed a diet of misinformation about the state of play in regards to Relationships Aotearoa. It is important to understand that officials have clearly been providing Minister Tolley with incorrect information as to both the financial viability of the organisation and processes to ensure the wellbeing of those 7,000 people, many of whom are in positions of high vulnerability. To give clearer information the following press release was provided last week by Acting Chair of Relationships Aotearoa, Dr Jane Allison:

“While Relationships Aotearoa continues talks with…

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